THE MAIN EVENT

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INSIDE/OUT by Patrick Keating. In association with Neworld Theatre, Main Street Theatre and Urban Crawl. April 2 - 12, 2015 (Preview April 1). Tickets: brownpapertickets.com

HEADLINES

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Little Mountain Gallery & Main Street Theatre present THE ODD COUPLE by Neil Simon. HELD OVER to Dec. 10, 2013 (no show Dec. 2 or 9). 7:30 PM (Doors @ 7:00). Little Mountain Gallery. Directed by Stephen Malloy. Starring Ryan Beil and Mike Wasko. With Lindsey Angell, Josh Drebit, Kyle Jespersen, Sebastian Kroon, Michael P. Northey, and Melanie Reich.

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Come join Main Street Theatre for a staged reading of Alex Lazardis Ferguson's new play PROXIMITY. Sat. May 11 at 8:00 PM (Doors @ 7:30). ADMISSION BY DONATION.

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Main Street Theatre presents a staged reading of HOME ALONE the classic holiday movie! Thurs. Dec. 12, 2013 at 9:30 PM (doors open at 9). Tickets by donation.

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Main Street Theatre presents... IT'S ABOUT TIME by Patrick Keating. Sun. Nov. 25 at 8 PM. Little Mountain Gallery. Also featuring: a curtain warmer by Charles Demers. Tickets by donation. For reservations call: (604) 992-2313.

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event image Congratulations to Sasa Brown who has been nominated for a Jessie Richardson Award for her Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role for her role in Main Street Theatre's Endgame! Visit the Jessies.

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The Vancouver Courier spotlighted Main Street Theatre in their best of 2012: "Main Street Theatre squeezed us all into its tiny venue for a real treat in April. Directed by Stephen Malloy, this scrappy young company produced Endgame with ash-covered Nagg (Daryl King) and Nell (Sasa Brown) imprisoned in trashcans by their son Hamm (Josh Drebit). At his beck and call was Ryan Beil as Clov. Known for productions of David Mamet's plays, this small company proved once again its versatility and virtuosity with Beckett's apocalyptic tale. Read more: Vancouver Courier

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FunFunFun Vancouver says "everything...about this production was simply brilliant. The staging was phenomenal, and the acting was just incredible."

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The Vancouver Sun says that we're "Shaking it up: Samuel Beckett’s classic Endgame highlights Tremors theatre festival".

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The Province picks Main Street's Endgame as one of the top Top 10 shows to see this spring. "This staging of Samuel Beckett’s play is the latest from the punching-above-its weight Main Street Theatre Company". Read it on The Province.

Main Street Theatre's Endgame part of Vancouver's 2012 Tremors Festival! Visit Tremors at Rumble.

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"Terrific play. Terrific production". Read reviews of True West

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Thanks to everyone who supported us at our Halloween Party/Fundraiser! The STAR CAPTAINS played and Red Truck beer and Barefoot wine was served. Best costume prize went to Mike Wasko!
See our Party Photos

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event imageJosh Drebit, Daryl King and Ryan Beil accept Jessie Richardson awards on behalf of Stephen Malloy (Best Director) and Barbara Pollard (Best Supporting Actress) for Main Street's Production of A Lie of the Mind. (Photograph by: Thor-Sten 2011) Visit the Jessies website

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event imageThe Jessie Richardson Awards committee applauds Main Street Theatre's production of A Lie of the Mind with 6 award nominations including Best Director, 4 Best Performances and Best Production! Visit the Jessies website

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Peter Birnie, Theatre critic for the Vancouver Sun writes about Main Street Theatre's production of A Lie of the Mind, "Stephen Malloy directs a strong cast who, to a man and woman, understand that this masterpiece of manipulation sneaks its subtle ideas into our subconscious by shouting them out." Read review

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Andrea Rabinovitch reviews for The Vancouver Observer "...an evening of theatre that is compelling, entertaining and hip...like a partnered dance that flows between scenes nailing the humour and the pathos in equal measure...a truly excellent event." Read review

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"Main Street Equity Co-op has done it again...Wouldn’t it be great if the Main Street gang could give us an entire season of Shepard and Mamet rather than just one a year?  But let’s not get greedy." Continue to read Jerry Wasserman's (vancouverplays.com) review of Lie of the Mind.

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"Fine direction, strong performances...once the actor has grasped the character, he or she can just let it rip. And rip they do." Read Jo Ledingham's (Vancouver Courier) review

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We boxed for your money!!! The card was full and there were three bouts. Thanks to everyone who came out and showed their support! "The only way to teach these people, is to punch them..." Click here to see live event photos by Emily Cooper.

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Main Street Theatre Fight Night/Fundraiser/Extravaganza!!!!! Sunday, Oct. 24 at the Russian Hall, 600 Campbell Ave.Doors @ 7:30 and the fights start @ 9:00pm! We are boxing for your money!!! The card is full and there are three bouts: Josh "The Hebrew Hammer" Drebit Vs. Charlie "Norris" Gallant; Ian "The Butcher" Butcher Vs. Andrew "What's My Name" McNee; AND THE MAIN EVENT: Daryl "The Animal Mother" King Vs. Ryan "The Teen Burger" Beil. It's going to be a great party. Boxing, Red Truck Beer, Bearflag vino and THE STAR CAPTAINS! THE STAR CAPTAINS will play when the fights are done. Door is by donation. Funds go toward our upcoming production of A LIE OF THE MIND November 19th-December 4th @ Little Mtn Gallery.

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event imageMain Street Theatre's American Buffalo is nominated for three 2010 Jessie Richardson Awards: Best Production; Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Lead Role (Ryan Beil); Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role (Daryl King).

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American Buffalo: Main Street Theatre's sold-out benefit show for Haiti raises $1100! The money donated by our supporters was matched by the Federal Government of Canada.

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event imageMain Street Theatre's Glengarry Glen Ross is nominated for two 2009 Jessie Richardson Awards! One for Best Production. The other for Outstanding Performance by a Supporting Actor - Alex Ferguson for Ricky Roma.

Main Street Theatre: Welcome

 

Welcome to Main Street Theatre. Main Street Theatre is a Vancouver based theatre company dedicated to producing contemporary classic plays in an intimate environment with a focus on storytelling. We believe in bringing this theatre to our community in an exciting and affordable way. With six shows and a total of two Jessie Richardson awards and eleven nominations under our belt, we're just getting started. Read about our next Main Event, below. We'd like to surprise you again.

Main Street Theatre: On Stage

 

INSIDE/OUT
by Patrick Keating

In association with Neworld Theatre, Main Street Theatre and Urban Crawl

April 2 - 12, 2015 (Preview April 1)

7:30 PM (Doors @ 7:00)  
Little Mountain Gallery
197 E.26th Ave.
Directions: maps.google.ca

>>INSIDE/OUT Press Photos

TICKETS
$20 at Brown Paper Tickets: (brownpapertickets.com, 1-800-838-3006) or $20 cash at the door (suggested donation)

Written and Performed by Patrick Keating

Directed and Dramaturged by Stephen Malloy

Lighting Design: Itai Erdal. Set Design: Barbara Clayden. Sound Design: Kate De Lorme. Stage Managemant: D.K. Poster: Christine Quintana

Vancouver actor and interdisciplinary theatre maker Patrick Keating presents his searing new autobiographical work, Inside/Out. Patrick reveals stories from the prison yard, a plane flight, and a run-in with clowns, that have all been part of his journey in, out, and through the revolving doors of the Canadian Criminal Justice System.

For many years Patrick was reluctant to share his story, thinking he might be ostracized from his present community

For most people, life in prison is a world that is unfamiliar. Those who have been in prison are  often hesitant to talk about their experiences, so for the most part what society hears are sensationalized versions used for political or ideological purposes. For many years Patrick was reluctant to share his story, thinking he might be ostracized from his present community. But with the political climate swinging to the right, and the Canadian Justice System replacing the adage 'Everyone deserves a second chance' with 'Once a criminal always a criminal’, he feels that it's about time to tell this story.

Inside/Out is a one person theatre piece. It is a true story. It is the story of a man who strived to become invisible. It's the story of his search through his own Penitentiary files, and the memories these files evoke. Memories of outside. Memories of choices made. His introduction to drugs. His introduction to crime. Memories of nearly ten years behind Penitentiary walls. It's the story of the people he met inside the Penitentiary that influenced his life. Of his transfer from Quebec during the tension filled time of the first referendum to Matsqui Penitentiary in British Columbia, where he enrolled in a theatre course — and the discovery of the possibility of a new way of life.

Patrick is so honest and engaging, it's impossible not to be caught up in this story about a search for community: the community of the street, the community of prison, and the community of theatre. After two years of workshop and development and two readings to packed houses, a full production of Inside/Out is premiering at Little Mountain Gallery, offering Vancouver audiences a unique glimpse of the “inside.”

More Info and Interviews: Patrick Keating (patk@telus.net)

Press

Review: by Kathleen Oliver, The Georgia Straight

By Patrick Keating. Directed by Stephen Malloy. Presented in association with Neworld Theatre, Main Street Theatre and Urban Crawl. At Little Mountain Gallery on April 2. Continues until April 12

Patrick Keating's Inside/Out: A Prison Memoir delivers evocative insights into life in the slammer

It’s been a long time since Patrick Keating took his first theatre class as an inmate at Matsqui Institution, but that experience paved the way for this intimate, accomplished solo show, a memoir of Keating’s years of incarceration.

Keating describes himself as a shy, skinny kid growing up in Montreal’s East End who took his first toke at the age of 12 and quickly progressed to harder drugs. “Look at you, using needles when you’re not even a teenager,” an older friend in the scene dopily enthuses. His drug use slides into activities that quickly put him on the wrong side of the law.

Keating doesn’t share a lot of details about the crimes that landed him in prison, and any sense of introspection is only hinted at. “It was my choice,” he tells us of his first stint: at a sentencing hearing, the teenaged Keating rejects the idea of rehab, and finds himself with a three-year sentence. “I thought maybe I hadn’t picked the right door,” is all he says of that decision.

a delicately observed and thoroughly engaging collection of stories about life inside

 

What he does offer is a delicately observed and thoroughly engaging collection of stories about life inside; his prison career lasted, he relates, “10 years, more or less, in and out, mostly in”.

Keating’s descriptions are honed and evocative. When he first spends the night in juvenile detention, “the atmosphere adds 10 pounds to each shoulder” and his bunk smells of “mothballs, stale sweat, and athlete’s feet”. His understated delivery and crack timing make many of his stories darkly funny. His incredulous account of the differences between minimum and maximum security prisons ends with a weary, “When people treat you like a regular person? Fuck, it wears you down.”

Director Stephen Malloy makes a virtue of simplicity in Little Mountain Gallery’s intimate space

Director Stephen Malloy makes a virtue of simplicity in Little Mountain Gallery’s intimate space. Complementing Keating’s spare, straightforward delivery is the nearly naked set by Barbara Clayden, Kate De Lorme’s effectively minimalist sound design, and Itai Erdal’s emotionally nuanced lighting.

In his program notes, Keating informs us that the educational opportunities that helped him to finally turn his life around are not available to inmates today. Given our government’s simple-minded and destructive “tough-on-crime” stance, this play is a vivid and necessary reminder that people in prison are, first and foremost, human beings.

 

Review: by Jo Ledingham, On the Scene

At Little Mountain Gallery (26th & Main) until April 12, 2015
1-800-838-3006/brownpapertickets.com or at the door. Cash only

INSIDE/OUT

Patrick Keating may be the only ex-con who refused to leave when he was due for release. Why? He’d been cast in Ubu Roi inside Matsqui Correctional Institution where he was serving time for the armed robbery of a TD bank and he didn’t want to let the rest of the cast down. When pressed by the prison officials, he replied that one of the things he’d learned in jail was to “take responsibility”. “This”, he told them, “is me bein’ responsible.”

He stayed, the show went on and he left Matsqui Correctional when he was ready. Bitten by the theatre bug, he enrolled as a student at Studio 58.

Keating has gone on to become an actor with a long list of credentials including TV (Stargate, Smallville and The X-Files) and stage (A Lie of the Mind, Cold Comfort, Glengarry Glen Ross and Penelope, amongst a long list of other critically acclaimed shows).

Inside/Out is not a ‘poor me’ piece of theatre nor does it glamourize prison life

Presented by Neworld TheatreMain Street Theatre and Urban Crawl, Inside/Out is a very candid memoir of a little more than a decade in Keating’s life. A “shy little boy”, according to his teachers, by the age of twelve he had used “grass, hash and acid” and was soon addicted to heroin. By sixteen, he was picked up by the cops for possession of stolen property – taking the rap for a friend who would have been tried as an adult. That was the beginning of Keating’s period of on-again/off-again imprisonment. Inside/Out is not a ‘poor me’ piece of theatre nor does it glamourize prison life.

Everything that happened to him, Keating tells us, was a result of choices he made, some really regrettable, including a remark he made to the judge who was about to sentence him. The offer on the table was incarceration or rehabilitation. “I don’t need rehab”, said Keating too quickly. Slam.

Keating has come out of this particular closet, supported by friends, fellow theatre artists and UBC’s Stephen Malloy who dramaturged and directed Inside/Out. In his program notes Keating particularly acknowledges “the Main Street boys” (Main Street Theatre company) who said if he wrote it, they’d fundraise and produce it. That was the deal and they kept it.

Inside/Out has an inclusive, friendly, ‘between us’ feel about it; we could be sitting in a pub with him

A solo show on a simple set (Barbara Clayden) with minimal but effective lighting (Itai Erdal), Inside/Out has an inclusive, friendly, ‘between us’ feel about it; we could be sitting in a pub with him. Despite how open he makes himself on stage in this tiny, funky venue, he remains, at sixty, a somewhat shy man with a wry sense of humour. Raised in Quebec, he retains the speech rhythms of an anglophone raised in La Belle Province; the final ‘g’ is consistently dropped and there’s something akin to an Irish lilt there as well. He’s very listenable over the eighty-minute, uninterrupted running time.

Peppering his work with self-deprecating humour, Keating makes completely comprehensible the lure of being “inside”. There is “a simplicity”, he says, in prison. Emotions – with the exception of anger – are kept completely under wraps. Of the outside, he says, “F**k, it wears you down when people treat you like a regular person.” And ironically, when he was released several times over the years, no one remembered him or was waiting for him. When he got picked up again, he was royally welcomed back by all the cons. These were his people and they were his community.

Writing and performing Inside/Out is one of the best choices Keating ever made.

Keating has another community now and he’s made a new life in the theatre. If there’s a message here – and it’s not hammered home, quite the contrary – it’s that we are responsible for the choices we make. Writing and performing Inside/Out is one of the best choices Keating ever made.

 

Review: by Paul Durras, BCbooklook and vancouverplays

The artful dodger goes straight

When we learn something new, we get pleasure pings in the brain.

we get pleasure pings in the brain [and] there are plenty of pings per minute

Performed with only a cardboard box and two benches, Inside/Out by ex-con-turned-professional-actor Patrick Keating certainly qualifies as a minimalist one-man show—it’s an intimate 80-minute encounter in a funky, small venue—but it succeeds as theatre beyond personality because it invites us to learn a great deal, in a short period, about a very different world.

There are plenty of pings per minute as we learn the details of what it’s like to survive in various Canadian prisons for long enough that it becomes extremely uncomfortable for an incarcerated person to accept both kindness and freedom.

With a well-honed script, Keating wisely eschews a ‘woe is me’ narrative in favour of non-dramatized tidbits, anecdotes and observations about his fellow inmates, institutional procedures and survival techniques inside the joint. There are lots of amusing recollections, but few lines are laugh-out-loud funny. Similarly, there are a few alarming revelations, but nothing horrific or jaw-droppingly cruel.

his approach to drama is very Canadian in a classic Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are?

Keating’s story and his presentation, from the get-go, convince us that he’s nothing special. He is speaking from the perspective of a typical prisoner. One could make an argument that his approach to drama is very Canadian in a classic Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are? kind of way. Inside/Out is a pleasing experience largely because Keating is a moderator for reality, not an exploiter of it.

He never raises his voice. He never hopes for, or expects, sympathy. His self-contained and calm demeanor encourages the audience to literally lean towards him. In this way, Keating’s deliberate reserve gives Inside/Out its own peculiar style. Because he does not go out of his way to focus attention on himself, his plight, his feelings, it’s more like we we’re watching someone through a one-way mirror, the way cops spy on people when they are being interrogated.

this comfortable voyeurism—watching one man in a theatrical cell of self-confinement—is further enhanced by the smart choices made by the director (and dramaturge) Stephen Malloy

This comfortable voyeurism—watching one man in a theatrical cell of self-confinement—is further enhanced by the smart choices made by the director (and dramaturge) Stephen Malloy. With the audience split into two opposing sections, just like Pacific Theatre, it’s impossible for an actor to cater to one side of the audience without alienating the other, so Keating spends much of his time addressing the walls of East and West while the audience watches from North and South.

The audience relaxes. We don’t have the uncomfortable feeling that we are only seeing half of a play. Instead we are more like someone sitting in a jury. We are watching the show on the sidelines, like at a football game. We drop the expectation that a one-man show is supposed to engage us face-to-face. We watch. We listen. We learn.

Near the outset of his monologue Keating describes how he learned to avoid being selected to answer questions in the classroom from his teachers. In essence, he taught himself to keep a low profile. This chameleon technique was further developed in prison where everyone must build and protect their own privacy turf in order to avoid confrontations and trouble.

Keating—the artful dodger—has an unusual charm as an actor because he has worked at the art of being anti-flamboyant

Actors are supposed to draw attention to themselves, to heighten and galvanize emotional situations; whereas Keating—the artful dodger—has an unusual charm as an actor because he has worked at the art of being anti-flamboyant. Inside/Out, as a result, makes for a strangely original evening. Inside/Out is a carefully non-emotional show. With its restraint, there is dignity.

Criminal behavior is too frequently glorified in our culture by Hollywood gangster movies, just for starters. Much to its credit, Inside/Out does not romanticize criminality in any way. It is mostly about survival behaviour. We are not pulling for Keating to escape from prison—because, after all, we can see for ourselves that he eventually ‘got out’. Instead we are simply learning what it takes to endure and cling to one’s sanity.

This production benefits from satisfying lighting design from the dependable Itai Erdal and intelligent sound design from Kate De Lorme. The script was brought to fruition over years rather than months, so Stephen Malloy and the theatre community can take some of the credit for a smart script that could serve any solo actor, not just Keating.

Mainly incarcerated back east, Keating got himself transferred to B.C. where he was able to participate in a production of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi in Matsqui Prison, part of a venerable rehabilitation program that was kickstarted by Leon Pownall who directed an unforgettable behind-bars production of Threepenny Opera in the late 1970s.

Matsqui’s theatre program was the key that Keating needed to escape from crime and punishment

Matsqui’s theatre program was the key that Keating needed to escape from crime and punishment, landing to roles in X-Files and Da Vinci’s Inquest, etc. During his monologue Keating lets us know that the Matsqui Prison theatre program has been curtailed as a frill by the Harper government. (Nonetheless we still have an unusually tolerant society that enables an ex-convict to receive grants from both Canada Council and BC Arts Council as a neophyte playwright.)

The ending still needs work, but that’s a quibble. More problematic is the fact that we are told next-to-nothing about how the heck Keating got into the labyrinth; at age 60, he’s tight-lipped (in the play) about his crimes and convictions. We are led to assume he attempted some bank robberies, but his criminal record is a mystery. It’s not clear how long he was in prison, how old he was when he left prison in his wake, and who supported him when he got out.

This could be a prudent approach. We have to like or at least respect Keating in order to accept him as a guide through the chilling and often ludicrous underworld of the Canadian penal system. But once we leave the theatre, it dawns on us the playwright might not have been telling us the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

 

If you have a stake in the heart and soul of Vancouver's theatre community, don't miss Patrick's show

Norman Armour, Executive Director
PuSh International Performing Arts Festival
 

Theatre is supposedly about "storytelling." To be honest, I'm not one to fully believe in that presumption, or definition as it were. That said, Inside/Out is about a story. It's also about a story that deserves to be told. And it's told by a storyteller that deserves to be listened to. Patrick Keating has been quietly fuelling this city's independent theatre scene with substance, rigour and honesty. If you have a stake in the heart and soul of Vancouver's theatre community, don't miss Patrick's show. Added to the mix is that he [is] presented by Main Street and Neworld. That's street cred to the 3rd degree. This is the last week. Note….the show's time is at 7:30.

 

Previews and Associated Press:

Actor Patrick Keating shares real-life prison experience in one-man show
Ian Bailey, The Globe and Mail

Actor shares prison experience in solo performance
Interview with Patrick Keating, CBC

Inside/Out is Patrick Keating’s real-life experiences in and out of the Canadian penitentiary system
Neworld Theatre

Patrick is so honest and engaging, it's impossible not to be caught up in this story about a search for community: the community of the street, the community of prison, and the community of theatre
vancouverplays.com

Podcast: Patrick Keating discusses his new stage show, which he wrote and stars in: Inside/Out: A Prison Memoir, running at the Little Mountain Gallery, 02-12 April 2015; he and Joseph Planta discuss writing a show like this, its impetus, and his time incarcerated
thecommentary.ca


Production Photos

Press Release